Meeting my neurosurgeon for the first time.Ā 

We had only been in Washington a few days when it was time to meet my neurosurgeon, Dr Sandhu for the first time. I was still jet lagged and struggling with adjusting to the time difference but tried to just roll with it and sleep whenever I could really. 

It was Wednesday 6th September, We all took a taxi down to Medstar Georgetown University Hospital. My first thoughts as we approached the hospital were that of the sheer size with different entrance numbers depending on your purpose for visiting. The site was huge with many campus’s with it being a teaching hospital. 


*A very small segment of the hospital* 

We went up to level 7 of entrance 1 (physicians offices) and checked in and waited to be called. Whilst waiting I had numerous forms to fill out, my vertigo was still bad from the journey so i felt like the paper was moving up and down which made for interesting handwriting!!

Initially I was called by the nurse who was lovely and took my blood pressure, weight, height and asked me some general health questions whilst documenting them on the computer. 


Not too long after I met the man himself. It was lovely to finally meet the man who would soon be performing such a major surgery. I maybe biased but I can quite honestly say with confidence that Dr Sandhu is one of the nicest consultants I have ever met, he is extremely polite, non-assuming, very calming and down to earth. Although the topic of conversation was serious it was an absolute pleasure to talk with him. I had my usual 101 (22) questions all written down and prepared and he was more than happy to answer each and every one. 

We discussed the surgery in more detail, I am very much the type of person that needs to know the details. Dr Sandhu initially pulled my imaging up on the computer and explained how C1 and C2 are dislocating and over rotating and how this compromises the vertebral artery and how my clivo-axial angle was acute causing compression of the brainstem which meant I warranted a skull fixation -C1-C2. Dr Sandhu discussed the method which was his own he had designed. The hardware really is like mechano only much more expensive than at Toys ‘R Us and can be adapted and tweaked for individual anatomy. The most common are T- bars or two rods at the back of the skull but quite often surgeons will design there own method which they have found works well and will use that. Dr Sandhu has designed the ‘grappling hooks’ method which essentially was like two bolts either side of the skull, less hardware but felt they fixated to what is very thin bone in that area well. Dr Sandhu proceeded to show me on his phone the method on an open skull during a surgery, I am a little geek at times so i was fascinated by this and not at all squeamish . Shame I didn’t show such enthusiasm back in the day in biology and I might have passed the exam!! We discussed length of surgery, the potential for ‘surprises’ during surgery especially with having EDS and the risk of excess bleeding due to fragile tissue. I had many questions about other possible complications afterwards like developing tethered cord and instability in other areas of my spine. The truth is this is very much a possibility and all I can do is try and keep those areas as strong as I possibly can and keep an eye on it with symptom tracking and scans. Dr Sandhu explained he would take rib from the back and place this over the fusion with the main aim for this to take and my own bone to grow which is then a successful fusion as you need your own bone to grow as you can’t rely solely on the hardware. We discussed a little about what would happen the morning of surgery and how I would need to arrive 2 hours before and I would be taken to a ward which is almost like a holding area where all patients imminently awaiting surgery go. Here I will be marked out by Dr Sandhu, meet the anaesthetist, possible student doctors and have IV’s placed. I discussed some of my fears regarding my stomach with Dr Sandhu as my gastro system is so shocking, he was extremely reassuring that we would find a combination of medications that would work for my stomach and use maximum anti-nausea medications to try and combat sickness. He was extremely well versed in EDS patients and POTS so knew all the things that could potentially arise. I would say I was in over an hour asking various questions and airing my worries and anxieties, never feeling rushed and always feeling understood. 
At the end of the consult we shook hands again and I said I would see him on Wednesday, Dr Sandhu assured me everything would be okay. I trusted him entirely. 
Seven days to go …….